Ireland's Pit Bull Terrier Association (IPBTA)
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Promoting responsible dog ownership along with providing athletic k9 sporting events that suit all our types of dogs.




responsible ownership guide lines

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responsible ownership guide lines

Post by Guest on Wed Jul 27, 2011 2:25 pm

i did'nt write this ! its a copy and paste job from another forum ...



Some people may be uncomfortable with the following recommendations. The issue of dog fighting is quite unpleasant, especially on a rescue site. However, we also believe it is irresponsible to deny the original purpose of this breed and not be prepared for any eventualities. Our goal is to minimize the risks for problems and to facilitate successful pit bull ownership by addressing all aspects of this wonderful breed. We see too many dogs forced to find a new home (and in some cases injured or killed) because of dog-to-dog aggression problems, to not emphasize the consequences of misunderstanding this breed. We want to make these events as unlikely as possible by informing potential pit bull owners.

Of course, each situation is different and our recommendations may not apply to all circumstances. It is mportant for pit bull owners and rescuers to understand that there are precautions to take when dealing with dogs with a fighting heritage. We encourage all pit bull owners to follow the guidelines described in this page.

How to prevent a fight
The very best situation to prevent a fight in your home is to have a pit bull as the only pet. Pit bulls are people-dogs anyway and if they receive enough attention from their family, they don't need a canine companion to be happy. However if you prefer having two dogs, and many people do, the next best situation is to have a compatible neutered male and a spayed female, whose interactions are always supervised. If you have multiple pit bulls or a pit bull in a multi-pet home, you might find our Crate and Rotate page helpful.

There is a higher incidence of aggressive behavior between dogs of the same sex. Two males or two females often view each other as rivals even if they appear to get along most of the time. This is a fact for every breed. Most dogs however, don't resolve conflicts with the determination and intensity of the Pit Bull. Remember that these dogs were "bred" to fight. Submission signals that would indicate the end of the hostilities can be ignored in the heat of a fight by Pit Bull type dogs.

We do not recommend allowing a fighting breed dog to establish pecking order on its own. The hierarchy will, therefore, remain unclear and cause tension between the dogs. Tension is a trigger for fights.

There are other stimuli that can trigger a fight, even with dogs of opposite sex. For that reason, PBRC does not encourage placing pit bulls in multiple-dog homes as problems between the dogs will surface eventually. It could take several years before conflicts reach serious proportions. Unfortunately, pit bulls are usually the dogs people rehome when serious problems occur.

Properly introduced, a neutered male and a spayed female with compatible personalities should be fine. They will, however, require strict supervision all their lives. Please follow the guidelines offered by PBRC to insure the safety of your dogs and avoid unpleasant situations.

Responsible Pit Bull Ownership Guidelines
Take note that a fight can strike suddenly and for no apparent reason. Warning signs can be very subtle with Pit Bulls and even completely absent in certain cases. Two dogs may be best friends for years, sleeping together, cuddling, playing, even eating from the same bowl, and one day something triggers one of them and boom! Often, the dogs act like best friends as soon as the fight is over. They might even lick each other's wounds. You have been warned, though. If they fight once, chances are they will fight again and will get better at it each time.

NEVER leave Pit Bulls unsupervised with other animals. We can't emphasize this enough. When no one is around to keep an eye on them, the dogs should be safely crated or in separate rooms even if they are best friends. You never know what might trigger a fight in your absence. All canines can fight, but Pit Bulls were bred to never quit. If no one is home to break the fight, the dogs could inflict serious injuries to each other, or worse.

Have your dog(s) spayed or neutered as early as possible. Females in their reproductive cycles and males that are triggered by their sexual hormones tend to be far more reactive and aggressive than those who are not.

Always monitor the dogs while they play and don't let things escalate. Roughhousing can trigger a fight if not kept under control. Pit Bulls like to play rough and can be pretty vocal. Their games often mimic a real fight and can be overwhelming for the other dog. Don't let the dogs push it too far. As the "leader" of the pack it is YOUR responsibility to set limits and keep the dogs under control.

Never leave food, bones, toys, or anything that could trigger a fight at their disposal. Keep in mind that certain dogs tend to push out any competition for what they perceive as limited resources - your attention, food, toys, etc.

Note that in general, the first fight is often an indicator of more to come. At this point, it may be necessary to separate the dogs. Many loyal Pit Bull owners have learned to live with dogs that don't get along. It is feasible but requires a great deal of commitment and discipline. Those who adapt their lives for this situation will tell you that the dogs are worth the efforts.

ALWAYS have your Pit Bull on leash when you take him/her for a walk.

Do not bring an adult Pit Bull to an off-leash dog park or any other area where it may come into contact with other dogs running loose.

Early socialization MAY help, but is not a guarantee that your Pit Bull won't become dog-aggressive at some point. ALWAYS be prepared for it!

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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by Guest on Wed Jul 27, 2011 2:33 pm

!


Last edited by Come & Go on Mon Dec 12, 2011 12:18 am; edited 1 time in total

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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by Harry on Wed Jul 27, 2011 2:40 pm

Nice read Wink

Thanks James.

I don't usually take much notice of PBRC tho scratch
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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by Guest on Wed Jul 27, 2011 2:49 pm

TBH harry i never even heard of PBRC i read this and tought i'd share it coz theres a lot of good advice in it .

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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by Guest on Wed Jul 27, 2011 4:54 pm

And truth in there too. Nice one JB

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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by rosscockram on Wed Jul 27, 2011 5:43 pm

Excellent read James .....

Nice post Wink

Ross :)
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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by YENALED on Wed Jul 27, 2011 6:02 pm

Excellent read. thanks james

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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by reaper on Sat Jul 30, 2011 9:46 am

both the parks near me are strictly leash(apparently),tho it seems im the only one to ever leash my dog.it frustrates me to the max..a small collie barking his heart out sprinted at sheevah the other day,i had to wrap her onto the railing and try deter the other dog,all while the owner stood across the field watching.he wasnt even calling his dog.

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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by YENALED on Sat Jul 30, 2011 11:21 am

David, what parks do you go to? You will have to be very careful, you should have your dog muzzled while walking in a park. I know it seems very unfair but you are required to do this by law and it will actually keep sheevah out of harms way, If dogs approach you and your dog is muzzled then you only have 1 to deal with. Please try and get a muzzle on her before you go to the park again.

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Re: responsible ownership guide lines

Post by Guest on Sat Jul 30, 2011 5:16 pm

i agree with jules about the muzzle i cant understand why some ppl with bull breeds just wont put one on . it does the dog no harm and they adapt to it real quick .

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